My Blog
By DAVID G. FEENEY, DDS
March 25, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures

When was the last time you paid Dr. David Feeney in Matthews, NC, a visit? If you're like many people, chances are it was more than six months ago. We hear the reasons why people neglect regular dental visits all the time: lack of money or quality dental insurance, busy schedules, and fear. However, your twice-yearly checkups are so important for your dental health and your overall health as well.

You may brush your teeth twice a day and even floss, and your teeth may feel fine, but regular dental checkups aren’t about addressing problems and reacting — they are about cavity prevention. No matter how much you brush and floss, there is still a chance that food or other debris can get lodged between your teeth, and there is also a chance that food and beverages can wear down your tooth enamel in between visits, making your teeth vulnerable to decay.

In addition to thorough teeth cleaning and polishing, these regular visits help us detect and prevent the onset of tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. During your visit, we’ll check the health of your mouth, teeth, gums, cheeks, and tongue. We’ll also check old fillings and restorations, as these can wear away over time from constant chewing, grinding, or clenching.

It's important to know that the majority of dental problems do not become visible or painful until they are highly advanced. And, unfortunately, serious oral issues are painful and expensive to treat. A deep cleaning twice a year by Dr. David Feeney in Matthews, NC, is the best way to hit all the spots you may have missed with brushing and flossing and prevent any problems that may have gone unseen.

Make sure your teeth get the professional attention they deserve! If you’re overdue for your next cleaning, please give us a call to schedule an appointment at 704-847-1000.

By DAVID G. FEENEY, DDS
March 23, 2022
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: teeth whitening  

Although regular brushing will help keep your teeth healthy, for many people brushing alone doesn't give them the dazzling smile they are hoping for. If your teeth are stained or discolored, professional whitening services can help. Dr. David Feeney offers teeth whitening in Matthews, NC.

Who Needs Whitening?

The color of teeth can vary from one person to the next. Habits such as smoking or consuming certain foods and drinks like coffee can stain your teeth. Teeth whitening in Matthews, NC, is available for individuals who would like to improve the color and overall appearance of their teeth.

How Is Whitening Done?

In-office teeth whitening is done using a specialized peroxide formula. Your dentist will make sure your gums are protected before applying the whitening gel. It is then activated with a special light and left on your teeth for about an hour. Your teeth can be 3-8 shades whiter with just one treatment and the results are long-lasting with the proper dental hygiene. 

Is Whitening Safe?

Whitening is safe for most patients. The dentist will decide if you are a good candidate for this procedure because there are some types of discoloration that don't respond to whitening like discoloration caused by certain medications. There are other treatment options for these kinds of stains.

Care For Your Teeth

Once you have completed your whitening procedure, you will want to care for your teeth going forward. You will want to make sure that you kick bad habits which are contributing to your teeth staining. You should also brush your teeth twice a day and floss at least once a day.

If you would like to learn more about brightening your smile, Dr. David Feeney offers teeth whitening in Matthews, NC. Call (704) 847-1000 to set up an appointment today.

 

By DAVID G. FEENEY, DDS
December 07, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cerec  

Getting dental crowns to restore your teeth doesn't have to involve taking messy impressions and waiting weeks for installation. CEREC Same-Day Crowns in Matthews, NC, can restore your teeth in one dental appointment. Your dentist, Dr. David Feeney, will answer all your questions about CEREC before you get them.

FAQs About CEREC

What Is CEREC?

CEREC, Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics, is an advanced dental restoration that gives you access to dental crowns in a single day. Unlike conventional dental crowns made at offsite labs, your dentist's office can use the advanced technology of CEREC to make flawlessly fitting dental crowns.

How Does CEREC Work?

The installation procedure for CEREC begins with a dental consultation. During your dental consultation, your dentist assesses your tooth's structural integrity. He then takes a digital image of your teeth. Your dentist uses computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) to construct your dental crowns.

How Long Does CEREC Installation Take?

Installing CEREC doesn't need multiple dental appointments because it uses advanced dental technology to create your dental crowns. After taking your dental impression your dentist constructs your new dental crowns in his office. You may need to wait about an hour while your dentist constructs your dental crowns. Therefore, getting CEREC crowns is a convenient option if your schedule is tight.

How Long Do CEREC Crowns Last?

Just because CEREC crowns take a shorter time to install than conventional crowns doesn't mean that they're weaker. CEREC crowns can serve you for up to 15 years. CEREC Same-Day Crowns in Matthews, NC, are durable. However, if you want to get the best out of your CEREC crowns you'll need to care for them properly.

How to Care for CEREC Crowns?

CEREC crowns need proper dental care just like your natural teeth. You need to follow proper dental rules such a regular brushing and flossing. CEREC crowns can't get tooth decay but they won't protect you from gum disease. That's why following proper dental care is still important after getting your CEREC crowns.

If you want to get CEREC Same-Day Crowns in Matthews, NC, call (704) 847-1000 to discuss the process with your dentist, Dr. Feeney.

By David G. Feeney, DDS
November 08, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
4TipsForImprovingYourOralHygieneTechnique

Although we've advanced leaps and bounds over the years treating dental disease, our strategy for preventing them hasn't changed much. That's because these prevention basics are quite effective—and as the old saying goes, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

The core of an effective dental disease prevention strategy is mind-numbingly simple—brush and floss every day. These twin cleaning tasks remove accumulated dental plaque, a thin, bacterial film on tooth surfaces that's the primary oral disease driver.

True, there have been innovations concerning the "tools of the trade," i.e., toothbrushes, toothpastes and flossing devices. But what really makes this prevention strategy work is a consistent daily habit of oral hygiene.

In a way, simply "showing up" for daily oral hygiene goes a long way. But you can go even farther if you perform these tasks with greater proficiency—becoming a hygiene "ninja," of sorts.

Here, then, are 4 tips to improve your brushing and flossing prowess.

Be thorough when you brush. Try to cover all of your tooth surfaces when you brush, being sure to work the bristles into all the nooks and crannies and around the gum lines. A thorough brushing should take about 2 minutes.

Easy does it. Hard scrubbing may work on floors, but not your teeth—aggressive brushing can damage your enamel and gums. Brush gently and let the mild abrasives in your toothpaste do the heavy work of plaque removal.

Don't forget to floss. Although you may not like this "other hygiene task," flossing is necessary to remove plaque between teeth that your brush can't reach. Be sure, then, that you floss at least once a day.

Take the "tongue test." Wondering how well you're doing with your oral hygiene? A quick way to find out is by swiping your tongue across your teeth: If they feel gritty rather than smooth, you may have left some plaque behind.

Be sure to also ask your dentist for additional tips on better brushing and flossing. Improving your technique can help you put even more distance between you and dental disease.

If you would like more information on daily care for teeth and gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

RemovingaToothCouldHelpCorrectThisParticularBiteProblem

Dentists extract millions of teeth each year, mostly because of disease. But sometimes a healthy tooth is removed to gain a more favorable, long-term dental health outcome.

An example of this is extracting teeth for the sake of orthodontic treatment. This is often beneficial when treating bite problems caused by crowding, a condition in which not enough space on the jaw exists to accommodate all of the teeth coming in. When this happens, the limited space can force teeth out of their proper alignment.

Crowding also complicates correcting the bite problem with braces: As with the eruption phase, there's no available room for orthodontic movement. One solution that may arise after a detailed examination is to open up space on the jaw by removing some of the teeth.

Planning this kind of tooth extrication requires careful forethought with the end in mind—ultimately, the dental providers involved want the resulting appearance after braces to look as natural as possible. For that reason, dentists usually choose teeth for extraction that are outside of the "smile zone" (the teeth visible while smiling) like premolars and molars.

Additionally, dentists are concerned about bone loss after extracting the teeth. Bone often diminishes around empty tooth sockets, especially if those sockets were damaged during extraction. This loss in bone can weaken the jaw structure and cause significant problems while moving teeth with braces.

To avoid this, dentists take great care during tooth removal not to damage the socket. Additionally, they may place a bone graft within the socket immediately after removing the tooth, especially if the space will remain vacant for a significant period of time. A bone graft serves as a scaffold upon which new bone cells can form and accumulate.

After the extractions, the orthodontist may then proceed with correcting the bite. Patients may also need some form of prosthetic teeth to fill in the spaces while wearing braces. Often prosthetic teeth can be incorporated with the braces for a more natural look. After braces, any remaining gaps may require further restoration, either with dentures, bridges or, later in adulthood, dental implants.

Complex bite problems like crowding pose unique challenges in correcting them. But using techniques like tooth extraction can help achieve a successful and satisfactory outcome.

If you would like more information on treatments for bite problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Removal for Orthodontic Reasons.”





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