My Blog

Posts for: May, 2019

By David G. Feeney, DDS
May 19, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
CrazyLittleThingCalledHyperdontia

The movie Bohemian Rhapsody celebrates the iconic rock band Queen and its legendary lead vocalist, Freddie Mercury. But when we see pictures of the flamboyant singer, many fans both old and new may wonder—what made Freddie’s toothy smile look the way it did? Here’s the answer: The singer was born with four extra teeth at the back of his mouth, which caused his front teeth to be pushed forward, giving him a noticeable overbite.

The presence of extra teeth—more than 20 primary (baby) teeth or 32 adult teeth—is a relatively rare condition called hyperdontia. Sometimes this condition causes no trouble, and an extra tooth (or two) isn’t even recognized until the person has an oral examination. In other situations, hyperdontia can create problems in the mouth such as crowding, malocclusion (bad bite) and periodontal disease. That’s when treatment may be recommended.

Exactly what kind of treatment is needed? There’s a different answer for each individual, but in many cases the problem can be successfully resolved with tooth extraction (removal) and orthodontic treatment (such as braces). Some people may be concerned about having teeth removed, whether it’s for this problem or another issue. But in skilled hands, this procedure is routine and relatively painless.

Teeth aren’t set rigidly in the jawbone like posts in cement—they are actually held in place dynamically by a fibrous membrane called the periodontal ligament. With careful manipulation of the tooth, these fibers can be dislodged and the tooth can be easily extracted. Of course, you won’t feel this happening because extraction is done under anesthesia (often via a numbing shot). In addition, you may be given a sedative or anti-anxiety medication to help you relax during the procedure.

After extraction, some bone grafting material may be placed in the tooth socket and gauze may be applied to control bleeding; sutures (stitches) are sometimes used as well. You’ll receive instructions on medication and post-extraction care before you go home. While you will probably feel discomfort in the area right after the procedure, in a week or so the healing process will be well underway.

Sometimes, dental problems like hyperdontia need immediate treatment because they can negatively affect your overall health; at other times, the issue may be mainly cosmetic. Freddie Mercury declined treatment because he was afraid dental work might interfere with his vocal range. But the decision to change the way your smile looks is up to you; after an examination, we can help you determine what treatment options are appropriate for your own situation.

If you have questions about tooth extraction or orthodontics, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Simple Tooth Extraction” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”


By DAVID G. FEENEY, DDS
May 15, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

You need a filling and a crown. What a nuisance, but you want to keep your teeth healthy. Thankfully, your dentist in Matthews, Dr. David CEREC Feeney, offers CEREC technology, creating same-day restorations from lifelike and durable porcelain. You'll be in and out of the office quickly and have a filling and a crown that beautify and strengthen your smile.

What is CEREC technology?

CEREC means Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramic. A specialized, computer-driven restoration process, CEREC designs and manufactures crowns, fillings and bridgework from a solid piece of porcelain. The imaging, impression, and design software is located right in the treatment room, and so is the CEREC milling machine.

From Dr. Feeney's evaluation (exam and X-rays) to oral impressions and tooth preparation to creation and placement of your restoration--it happens in about two hours. Your dentist does it all in his Matthews office with no outside dental labs and with no messy, uncomfortable impression trays. CEREC technology makes it easy and quick, taking accurate imaging and custom-milling your crown or bridge on site. You might even want to watch the process unfold!

How do CEREC restorations compare to conventional ones?

CEREC restorations look totally lifelike, and they resist stains from coffee, tea, tobacco, and more. The new bridge, crown or filling blends in with surrounding dentition in terms of shape and color. There are no metal clasps, amalgam filling material or obvious gold or alloy metals to call attention to a dental crown.

Yet, CEREC restorations are highly durable. A study cited by the National Center for Biotechnology Information says that most of these same-day restorations last and function well for 10 years and beyond.

Plus, when you and Dr. Feeney choose a CEREC restoration, count on a rapid turnaround time with no awkward temporaries to wear or multiple trips to the dental office to scramble your busy schedule. That means convenience and a high rate of satisfaction.

Consult us

Like other people, you may have questions about CEREC restorations. Come talk to your dentist, Dr. David Feeney, to learn more. Phone for an appointment in Matthews, NC, won't you? (704) 847-1000.


By David G. Feeney, DDS
May 09, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth loss  
ToothLossAHealthRiskforOlderAdults

Tooth loss is a problem that affects many seniors—and since May is Older Americans Month, this is a good time to talk about it. Did you know that more than a quarter of adults over age 75 have lost all of their natural teeth? This not only affects their quality of life but poses a significant health risk.

According to a study in The Journal of Prosthodontics, significant tooth loss is associated with increased risk for malnutrition—and also for obesity. If this seems like a contradiction, consider that when you have few or no teeth, it’s much easier to eat soft, starchy foods of little nutritional value than it is to eat nutritious fresh fruits and vegetables. If all of your teeth are missing, it’s especially critical to replace them as soon as possible.

There are several ways to replace a full set of missing teeth, including removable dentures, overdentures, and fixed dentures:

Removable dentures are the classic replacement teeth that you put in during the day and take out at night. (However, if you suffer from sleep apnea, research has found that keeping dentures in at night may help keep the airway open, so if you have this condition, be sure to mention it to your doctor and dentist it). Dentures have come a long way in terms of how convincing they look, but they still have some disadvantages: For one thing, they take some getting used to—particularly while eating. Also, wearing removable dentures can slowly wear away the bone that they rest on.  As that bone gradually shrinks over time, the dentures cease to fit well and require periodic adjustment (re-lining) or a remake.

Overdentures are removable dentures that attach onto a few strategically placed dental implants, which are small titanium posts placed in the bone beneath your gums. Strong and secure, implants prevent the denture from slipping when you wear it. Implants also slow the rate of bone loss mentioned above, which should allow the denture to fit better over a longer period of time. The ability to maintain hygiene is easier because you can remove them for cleaning.

Fixed implant-supported dentures are designed to stay in your mouth all the time, and are the closest thing to having your natural teeth back. An entire row of fixed (non-removable) replacement teeth can usually be held in place by 4-6 dental implants. Dental implant surgery is an in-office procedure performed with the type of anesthesia that’s right for you. After implants have been placed and have integrated with your jaw bone—generally after a few months—you can enjoy all of your favorite foods again without worry or embarrassment.

If you would like more information about tooth-replacement options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Overdentures & Fixed Dentures” and “Removable Full Dentures.”