My Blog

Posts for: March, 2019

By David G. Feeney, DDS
March 20, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: nutrition  
NutritionfortheBestOralHealth

It's National Nutrition Month! Good nutrition is key to overall health, but poor dental health can have a big impact on your ability to get the right nutrients. Your mouth is the first step in the digestive system, so if teeth and gums are in poor shape, food choices can be severely limited. Here are some nutritional guidelines that will benefit your oral health as well as your overall health.

Get plenty of fruits and vegetables. Plant foods provide many oral health benefits:

  • Crunchy fruits and vegetables scrub debris from your teeth during chewing and stimulate the production of saliva, which neutralizes acid and helps rebuild tooth enamel.
  • Dark, leafy greens are a good source of iron, calcium and many vitamins that are good for your teeth and gums.
  • Several fruits have vitamin C, an essential for healthy gums.
  • Bananas have magnesium, which builds tooth enamel.
  • Many yellow and orange fruits supply vitamin A, which keeps the soft membranes in your mouth healthy.

Go for dairy. Dairy products—for example, cheese, milk and unsweetened yogurt—neutralize acid as well as contribute tooth- and bone-strengthening minerals such as calcium and phosphorus.

Eat whole grains. An excess of refined carbohydrates can lead to chronic inflammation, which contributes to gum disease and many other ailments. However, the complex carbohydrates found in whole grains work against inflammation.

Incorporate all food groups. Strive to eat a balanced diet that includes healthy foods from all food groups. For example:

  • Lean proteins are essential for keeping your teeth and gums healthy.
  • Good fats such as those found in salmon and nuts work against inflammation. In addition, nuts stimulate the production of saliva and contain vitamins and minerals to keep teeth strong.
  • Legumes are a great source of many tooth-healthy vitamins and minerals.

Limit sugary or acidic foods and beverages. Acid from certain foods and beverages can weaken tooth enamel, leading to cavities. The bacteria in your mouth feed on sugar and release acid that eats away at tooth enamel, causing cavities. How you eat and drink also affects dental health. For example, if you indulge in sugary treats, do so with a meal if possible so that other foods can help neutralize the acid. And if you drink lemonade or soda, don't brush your teeth immediately afterwards. Instead, wait at least 30 minutes before brushing to give your saliva a chance to neutralize the acid.

Getting the right nutrition for a healthy body requires good dental health, so it pays to take good care of your teeth. For a lifetime of good oral health, choose foods that keep your teeth and gums healthy, and don't forget to schedule regular dental checkups to make sure your teeth and gums are in great shape. If you have questions about diet and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By David G. Feeney, DDS
March 11, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental ImplantsFind out how dental implants are able to replace missing teeth for life.

Are you missing one or more teeth? Are you looking for a restoration that will not just look like the rest of your teeth but also function similarly? If you said “yes” then it’s time to talk to our Matthews, NC, dentist Dr. David Feeney about how dental implants could improve the health and appearance of your smile.

What is a dental implant?

An implant is a very small metal restoration that is placed into the jawbone below the gum line. While the implant isn’t visible when you smile, it will provide a long-term and stable foundation from which to support a false tooth. Implants can be a lifelong restoration because they actually fuse together naturally with the bone and tissue in a process known as osseointegration. Once osseointegration is complete, the implant will now function in the same way as natural tooth roots.

How long does it take to get dental implants?

Getting implants requires multiple steps and several months. The length of your treatment will depend on factors such as your health, how quickly the implant bonds with the jawbone and how many implants you are getting. After all, several implants can be placed along the jawbone to support a complete set of dentures (this process will take longer than for those patients only receiving a single dental implant).

Theses multiple treatment steps include:

  • Consultation, physical exam and x-rays
  • Minor surgery to place the implant
  • 3-6 months to allow the mouth to heal and for the jawbone to fuse together with the implant
  • Another minor procedure to place the abutment, a connector that sits on top of the implant
  • Fitting and then permanently cementing the dental crown over the abutment to complete the implant

Am I a good candidate for dental implants?

If you are an adult dealing with tooth loss then chances are you could benefit from getting dental implants in Matthews, NC. Of course, our restorative dentist will need to perform a thorough examination complete with x-rays to make sure that your jawbone and the rest of your mouth is healthy enough to support an implant.

Do you have questions about getting dental implants in Matthews, NC? Do you want to find out if you are an ideal candidate for this restoration? If so, then call our dental office today to schedule your consultation with Dr. Feeney.


PreventWhiteSpotsonTeethWhileWearingBraceswithDiligentOralHygiene

After months of wearing braces it's time for the big reveal: your new and improved smile! Your once crooked teeth are now straight and uniform.

But a look in the mirror at your straighter teeth might still reveal something out of place: small chalky-white spots dotting the enamel. These are most likely white spot lesions (WSLs), points on the enamel that have incurred mineral loss. It happens because mouth acid shielded by your braces contacted the teeth at those points for too long.

Most mouth acid is the waste product of bacteria that thrive in dental plaque, a thin film of food particles that can build up on tooth surfaces. High levels of acid are a definite sign that plaque hasn't been removed effectively through brushing and flossing.

But normal hygiene can be difficult while wearing braces: it's not easy to maneuver around brackets and wires to reach every area of tooth surface. Specialized tooth brushes can help, as well as floss threaders that help maneuver floss more easily through the wires. A water irrigator that uses pulsating water to remove plaque between teeth is another option.

However, if in spite of stepped-up hygiene efforts WSLs still develop, we can treat them when we've removed your braces. One way is to help re-mineralize the affected tooth surfaces through over-the-counter or prescription fluoride pastes or gels. It's also possible re-mineralization will occur naturally without external help.

While your teeth are sound, their appearance might be diminished by WSLs. We can improve this by injecting a liquid tooth-colored resin below the enamel surface. After hardening with a curing light, the spot will appear less opaque and more like a normal translucent tooth surface. In extreme cases we may need to consider porcelain veneers to cosmetically improve the tooth appearance.

In the meantime while wearing braces, practice thorough dental hygiene and keep up your regular cleaning visits with your general dentist. If you do notice any unusual white spots around your braces, be sure to see your dentist or orthodontist as soon as possible.

If you would like more information on dental care during orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “White Spots on Teeth during Orthodontic Treatment.”